Power Plant K, Kelenföld, Budapest
Power Plant K, Kelenföld, Budapest

Like Antonín Dvořák knew so well when he composed his Symphony No. 9, From the New World, a metropolis always has utopian characteristics. It stimulates and intensifies the awareness of a crisis, but it also retains the ability to suggest (or, perhaps, reflect) a coherent social and spatial alternative to existing conditions. Apart from how their ideas might have been put in practice in the actual architecture of a place, the metropolis as a formation in the history of ideas has been anticipated by thinkers and dreamers such as Piranesi, Fourier and Le Corbusier. Where this is better seen is in cities like Budapest, where the urban space has been divided in districts with Roman numbers, as if to limit the opportunities conceded to improvisation, and where one walks in a state of flickering continuum between fading Art Deco ornaments, illusion-filled colors, and tall stacks of matchboxes.

Keep on reading via Permanent Residents of Utopia | VERBUNKOS by Stefano Gulizia